Online MBAs: Worth it?


robert v.

I'm considering doing an online MBA, and have been a bit unconvinced that this kind of program will have the same lasting value as a classroom based MBA program (even a part-time MBA.)

And since the most reputable programs are often the most expensive, this is a big investment - so I want to make sure that this is the right decision.

Can anybody point to any current salary data or statistics that show if distance learning MBA programs pay off in the end? I'm generally considering US online MBAs, such as the ones at UNC, Temple Fox, IU Kelley, and ASU Carey.

I'm considering doing an online MBA, and have been a bit unconvinced that this kind of program will have the same lasting value as a classroom based MBA program (even a part-time MBA.)

And since the most reputable programs are often the most expensive, this is a big investment - so I want to make sure that this is the right decision.

Can anybody point to any current salary data or statistics that show if distance learning MBA programs pay off in the end? I'm generally considering US online MBAs, such as the ones at UNC, Temple Fox, IU Kelley, and ASU Carey.
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vivekd

no

no
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Duncan

There is not much data published by schools to support that, other than by Kelley. For a solid investment, take a campus-based MBA.

There is not much data published by schools to support that, other than by Kelley. For a solid investment, take a campus-based MBA.
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BigD

The dominant driver of its value is whether it is awarded by a reputable university with a full-time programme as well.

Most of those have one or two weeks attendance a year so strictly speaking are "blended" delivery.

If the online delivery is collaborative and well-deigned then in my view such a blended course offer 75% of the benefits of a high attendance course in terms of knowledge acquisition. The networking aspect of it will obviously differ.

Personally I consider the Exec modular courses to be the optimum structure as it give more time reflect and integrate the knowledge over a longer period.

Obviously a meaningful answer it depends on your objectives , resources, level of work experience and current status.

BigD

The dominant driver of its value is whether it is awarded by a reputable university with a full-time programme as well.

Most of those have one or two weeks attendance a year so strictly speaking are "blended" delivery.

If the online delivery is collaborative and well-deigned then in my view such a blended course offer 75% of the benefits of a high attendance course in terms of knowledge acquisition. The networking aspect of it will obviously differ.

Personally I consider the Exec modular courses to be the optimum structure as it give more time reflect and integrate the knowledge over a longer period.

Obviously a meaningful answer it depends on your objectives , resources, level of work experience and current status.

BigD

quote
BigD

It is worth noting that some good schools offering distance learning or blended MBAs do not specify mode of attendance on the certificate eg Warwick, Manchester and Durham (but they usually do on the transcript). So at the filtering-out stage a potential employer may not know if you have undertaken distance learning or exec/part time. This boosts its value in my mind.

BigD

It is worth noting that some good schools offering distance learning or blended MBAs do not specify mode of attendance on the certificate eg Warwick, Manchester and Durham (but they usually do on the transcript). So at the filtering-out stage a potential employer may not know if you have undertaken distance learning or exec/part time. This boosts its value in my mind.

BigD
quote
maubia

I'm considering doing an online MBA, and have been a bit unconvinced that this kind of program will have the same lasting value as a classroom based MBA program (even a part-time MBA.)

And since the most reputable programs are often the most expensive, this is a big investment - so I want to make sure that this is the right decision.

Can anybody point to any current salary data or statistics that show if distance learning MBA programs pay off in the end? I'm generally considering US online MBAs, such as the ones at UNC, Temple Fox, IU Kelley, and ASU Carey.


Hi,
it's not from the BS you are researching but it can give you some ideas of possible outcomes

http://www2.euromba.org/view.asp?view=page&show=JNOQFPC0&mmid=54&sid=222

<blockquote>I'm considering doing an online MBA, and have been a bit unconvinced that this kind of program will have the same lasting value as a classroom based MBA program (even a part-time MBA.)

And since the most reputable programs are often the most expensive, this is a big investment - so I want to make sure that this is the right decision.

Can anybody point to any current salary data or statistics that show if distance learning MBA programs pay off in the end? I'm generally considering US online MBAs, such as the ones at UNC, Temple Fox, IU Kelley, and ASU Carey.</blockquote>

Hi,
it's not from the BS you are researching but it can give you some ideas of possible outcomes

http://www2.euromba.org/view.asp?view=page&show=JNOQFPC0&mmid=54&sid=222
quote
sharneel

Exactly the answer I was looking for! I have just received an offer from WBS for DLMBA and as I am considering whether to accept or not, this was one of the questions bothering me. So a typical degree certificate for a DLMBA would look exactly like a FT/PT MBA?


It is worth noting that some good schools offering distance learning or blended MBAs do not specify mode of attendance on the certificate eg Warwick, Manchester and Durham (but they usually do on the transcript). So at the filtering-out stage a potential employer may not know if you have undertaken distance learning or exec/part time. This boosts its value in my mind.

BigD

Exactly the answer I was looking for! I have just received an offer from WBS for DLMBA and as I am considering whether to accept or not, this was one of the questions bothering me. So a typical degree certificate for a DLMBA would look exactly like a FT/PT MBA?




<blockquote>It is worth noting that some good schools offering distance learning or blended MBAs do not specify mode of attendance on the certificate eg Warwick, Manchester and Durham (but they usually do on the transcript). So at the filtering-out stage a potential employer may not know if you have undertaken distance learning or exec/part time. This boosts its value in my mind.

BigD</blockquote>
quote
ralph

The dominant driver of its value is whether it is awarded by a reputable university with a full-time programme as well.

Agreed. Stick with those accredited by AACSB, EQUIS, or AMBA.

In my opinion, the real value of these programs is more along the lines of that offered by part-time and EMBA programs: you're able to immediately apply the learning to your day-to-day work.

These programs tend to work better when they have on-campus residencies ("blended" delivery, as BigD says.) This adds value in terms of networking and soft skill development.

It's more difficult to compare distance learning and blended programs to traditional full-time MBA programs, in that the latter usually have more potential to dramatically transform careers: many students pursue online MBAs in order to increase their value in their current positions or firms, rather than to completely shift in industries or functional roles.

I'm not convinced that having "Online MBA" on your diploma should make any difference. It's a markedly bad idea to try to fool future employers.

<blockquote>The dominant driver of its value is whether it is awarded by a reputable university with a full-time programme as well.</blockquote>
Agreed. Stick with those accredited by AACSB, EQUIS, or AMBA.

In my opinion, the real value of these programs is more along the lines of that offered by part-time and EMBA programs: you're able to immediately apply the learning to your day-to-day work.

These programs tend to work better when they have on-campus residencies ("blended" delivery, as BigD says.) This adds value in terms of networking and soft skill development.

It's more difficult to compare distance learning and blended programs to traditional full-time MBA programs, in that the latter usually have more potential to dramatically transform careers: many students pursue online MBAs in order to increase their value in their current positions or firms, rather than to completely shift in industries or functional roles.

I'm not convinced that having "Online MBA" on your diploma should make any difference. It's a markedly bad idea to try to fool future employers.
quote
ezra

There is not much data published by schools to support that, other than by Kelley.

Speaking of which, I just saw that data that suggests that Kelley Direct MBA graduate salary went up this year. Looks like the salaries from the class of 2012 average about $104k (an increase of 36% from average entry salaries.)

Comparatively, for the class of 2010, average post-graduation salaries were about $90k. Things seem to be looking up for this program. I just wish that other online MBA programs would release salary data.

<blockquote>There is not much data published by schools to support that, other than by Kelley.</blockquote>
Speaking of which, I just saw that data that suggests that Kelley Direct MBA graduate salary went up this year. Looks like the salaries from the class of 2012 average about $104k (an increase of 36% from average entry salaries.)

Comparatively, for the class of 2010, average post-graduation salaries were about $90k. Things seem to be looking up for this program. I just wish that other online MBA programs would release salary data.
quote
ralph

Speaking of which, I just saw that data that suggests that Kelley Direct MBA graduate salary went up this year. Looks like the salaries from the class of 2012 average about $104k (an increase of 36% from average entry salaries.)

Does anybody else find it odd that this average salary is actually HIGHER than that reported for Kelley's full-time MBA graduates in 2012 (Kelley reports this at about $100k.)

<blockquote>Speaking of which, I just saw that data that suggests that Kelley Direct MBA graduate salary went up this year. Looks like the salaries from the class of 2012 average about $104k (an increase of 36% from average entry salaries.)</blockquote>
Does anybody else find it odd that this average salary is actually HIGHER than that reported for Kelley's full-time MBA graduates in 2012 (Kelley reports this at about $100k.)
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Duncan

The online students are much older, and later in their career progression. I bet when they are the same age the full-time students will be on more.

The online students are much older, and later in their career progression. I bet when they are the same age the full-time students will be on more.
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ralph

True: the average age in the current online MBA cohort is 31; in the full-time program it's 28. I guess those few years explain the marginal difference in salary.

True: the average age in the current online MBA cohort is 31; in the full-time program it's 28. I guess those few years explain the marginal difference in salary.
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robert v.

Personally I consider the Exec modular courses to be the optimum structure as it give more time reflect and integrate the knowledge over a longer period.

That's interesting, since at one point I was considering a general management program - but it seemed like a blended online MBA would have more benefits in the long-run.

It's just a bit strange to me that it's so hard to nail down the return on investment for online MBA programs. It makes me think that the data, mainly in terms of salary increase, is not that great.

<blockquote>Personally I consider the Exec modular courses to be the optimum structure as it give more time reflect and integrate the knowledge over a longer period.</blockquote>
That's interesting, since at one point I was considering a general management program - but it seemed like a blended online MBA would have more benefits in the long-run.

It's just a bit strange to me that it's so hard to nail down the return on investment for online MBA programs. It makes me think that the data, mainly in terms of salary increase, is not that great.
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Duncan

I think you are right.

I think you are right.
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