Online MBA or General Management Program?


robert v.

Thoughts on the differences between the two?

I was looking at some of the higher-end distance learning MBA programs - including [email protected], IE's Global MBA, and Indiana/Kelley. But now I'm seeing general management programs that require less time and money - Harvard's is only $59k, for instance, and only requires two on-campus sessions - and wondering if this isn't the way to go.

Does anybody have any experiences with deciding between the two types of programs? I understand that with a GMP, I'd probably not have the same kind of post-graduation career services support - but this doesn't seem to be a strong suit of the distance learning programs either.

What would I be gaining by spending almost twice as much on an online MBA program?

Thoughts on the differences between the two?

I was looking at some of the higher-end distance learning MBA programs - including [email protected], IE's Global MBA, and Indiana/Kelley. But now I'm seeing general management programs that require less time and money - Harvard's is only $59k, for instance, and only requires two on-campus sessions - and wondering if this isn't the way to go.

Does anybody have any experiences with deciding between the two types of programs? I understand that with a GMP, I'd probably not have the same kind of post-graduation career services support - but this doesn't seem to be a strong suit of the distance learning programs either.

What would I be gaining by spending almost twice as much on an online MBA program?
quote
maubia

hi,
have you looked here:
http://www.find-mba.com/board/24548
?

hi,
have you looked here:
http://www.find-mba.com/board/24548
?
quote
robert v.

I did. But the consensus seemed to be that there is less networking potential and career services support in a GMP versus an in-class program. But these qualities seem to be also true in general for online MBA programs, which is why I'm finding it hard to justify the extra expense and time.

Also, wouldn't I be able to better develop my soft skills and leadership potential through an in-class GMP, compared to a distance-based MBA?

I did. But the consensus seemed to be that there is less networking potential and career services support in a GMP versus an in-class program. But these qualities seem to be also true in general for online MBA programs, which is why I'm finding it hard to justify the extra expense and time.

Also, wouldn't I be able to better develop my soft skills and leadership potential through an in-class GMP, compared to a distance-based MBA?
quote

Hello Robert,

I am the community manager for the [email protected] program and I would be happy to set up a conversation between yourself and our admissions team if you are interested.

This could be a good opportunity for you to learn more about our program as well as our career services and how we ensure that you are still able to take advantage of the networking opportunities that a traditional MBA program offers.

You can contact me directly via email: [email protected]

Thank you for your interest in our program and best of luck with your search! I look forward to hearing from you.

Best,
Harrison

Hello Robert,

I am the community manager for the [email protected] program and I would be happy to set up a conversation between yourself and our admissions team if you are interested.

This could be a good opportunity for you to learn more about our program as well as our career services and how we ensure that you are still able to take advantage of the networking opportunities that a traditional MBA program offers.

You can contact me directly via email: [email protected]

Thank you for your interest in our program and best of luck with your search! I look forward to hearing from you.

Best,
Harrison
quote
Sparks

Hi Robert,

Whilst a lot depends of each specific programme, my strong instinct would be to choose a solid GMP over a pure distance learning MBA.

This is because a well-run, comprehensive GMP should boost your soft skills. A pure distance course can't do this. In my experience, it's the soft skills that truly count. (I have worked with MBAs from top tier schools and recruited MBAs.) Having said that, the better distance MBAs in the UK, such as Warwick and Manchester, use blended learning.

HOWEVER, a lot depends on the specific school and programe. A GMP from Harvard would obviously count more than an MBA from a little-known school. NB: I'm based in the UK, so the position in the US may differ.

Hi Robert,

Whilst a lot depends of each specific programme, my strong instinct would be to choose a solid GMP over a pure distance learning MBA.

This is because a well-run, comprehensive GMP should boost your soft skills. A pure distance course can't do this. In my experience, it's the soft skills that truly count. (I have worked with MBAs from top tier schools and recruited MBAs.) Having said that, the better distance MBAs in the UK, such as Warwick and Manchester, use blended learning.

HOWEVER, a lot depends on the specific school and programe. A GMP from Harvard would obviously count more than an MBA from a little-known school. NB: I'm based in the UK, so the position in the US may differ.
quote
ezra

This is because a well-run, comprehensive GMP should boost your soft skills. A pure distance course can't do this. In my experience, it's the soft skills that truly count. (I have worked with MBAs from top tier schools and recruited MBAs.) Having said that, the better distance MBAs in the UK, such as Warwick and Manchester, use blended learning.

Good point, but like OP said, the Harvard GMP only requires two on-campus sessions, which pretty much matches up with many blended-learning MBA programs.

I think it ultimately would depend on your age and experience level. Participants in Harvard's GMP program are usually pertty senior, having between 15 and 20 years of experience. For the Durham and Warwick programs, it's more like 10-12.

<blockquote>This is because a well-run, comprehensive GMP should boost your soft skills. A pure distance course can't do this. In my experience, it's the soft skills that truly count. (I have worked with MBAs from top tier schools and recruited MBAs.) Having said that, the better distance MBAs in the UK, such as Warwick and Manchester, use blended learning.</blockquote>
Good point, but like OP said, the Harvard GMP only requires two on-campus sessions, which pretty much matches up with many blended-learning MBA programs.

I think it ultimately would depend on your age and experience level. Participants in Harvard's GMP program are usually pertty senior, having between 15 and 20 years of experience. For the Durham and Warwick programs, it's more like 10-12.
quote
robert v.

Thanks everybody for your advice.

I think I'm going to opt for an MBA program that has online elements - just because I think I'm under the experience level for most general management programs. So, I'm checking out [email protected], Worcester Polytechnic, Carnegie Mellon, specifically.

Thanks everybody for your advice.

I think I'm going to opt for an MBA program that has online elements - just because I think I'm under the experience level for most general management programs. So, I'm checking out [email protected], Worcester Polytechnic, Carnegie Mellon, specifically.
quote

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